foodffs:

Ultimate chocolate-espresso brownies
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

extendedburning:

godtxt:

please do not let ferguson die out like everything else big does. do not let this die out. do not let this continue on for three days and then everyone forget about it. do not let this happen.

queue this post up 3 days from now, a week from now, a month from now, a month from then. make sure even if you forget your blog will remember.

(Source: angel-scum, via shuttersmiley)

Tags: ferguson

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion


  People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
  
  Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
  
  “We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
  
  Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
  
  As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
  
  But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
  
  The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
  
  According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
  
  Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
  
  “Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
  
  UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

(via afro-dominicano)

afro-dominicano:

Milky Way above Atacama Salt Lagoon

Galaxies, stars, and a serene reflecting pool combine to create this memorable land and skyscape.

Image Credit & Copyright: Alex Tudorica (AIfA, U. Bonn)

The featured panorama is a 12-image mosaic taken last month from the Salar de Atacama salt flat in northern Chile. The calm water is Laguna Cejar, a salty lagoon featuring a large central sinkhole. On the image left, the astrophotographer’s fiancee is seen capturing the same photogenic scene.

The night sky is lit up with countless stars, the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies on the left, and the band of our Milky Way galaxy running diagonally up the right. The Milky Way may appear to be causing havoc at the horizon, but those are just the normal lights of a nearby town.

Tags: science

foodffs:

Karen Weinberg’s Lamb Burgers with Tzatziki and Arugula

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

Tags: &@$! recipes

houseofdawn:

I want whatever drug drake is on

houseofdawn:

I want whatever drug drake is on

(via chocolatehiddlestoner)

Tags: lol

"

I will be loud and vulgar and angry and me. So change your ways or shut your racist mouths. Use your liberal rationality to unlearn your contempt for me and my people, or shut your racist mouths.

I am not going to eat myself up inside anymore. I am not going to eat myself up inside anymore. I am not going to eat myself up inside anymore.

I am going to eat you.

"

Rosario Morales, I am the Reasonable One (1986)

(Source: triguenaista, via fucknofetishization)

Hey, seeming to you nobody likes us?

(via greatrunner)

Tags: quotes

queenconsuelabananahammock:

sheenvelopesthenight:

la-rinascente:

la-rinascente:

My Kanye-Interrupting-Taylor shirt finally came in the mail.

On this day five years ago, September 13th 2009, the world witnessed one of the most iconic moments of human history: Kanye West interrupting Taylor Swift at the VMA awards. I celebrate this day by looking back at my honorary shirt. In Yeezus name, amen.

Where can I get this shirt?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^

queenconsuelabananahammock:

sheenvelopesthenight:

la-rinascente:

la-rinascente:

My Kanye-Interrupting-Taylor shirt finally came in the mail.

On this day five years ago, September 13th 2009, the world witnessed one of the most iconic moments of human history: Kanye West interrupting Taylor Swift at the VMA awards. I celebrate this day by looking back at my honorary shirt. In Yeezus name, amen.

Where can I get this shirt?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^

(via shuttersmiley)

Tags: lol